13 September 2007

Wow... I made it!

The Flyer by Marjorie Jones
Hello friends, I have arrived, lifting my head from endless research hours and settling into my new apartment. I moved recently and it's amazing how long someone can live out of boxes! But things are coming along and I realized that today is my day to post!

So this is more of a blog by to let everyone know that I enjoy coming by to check out everyone's posts and I hope to be back on track with the real world in the near future.

In lieu of a lesson or interesting tidbit from the research I've been doing for my next 20th Century historical novel (set in Africa this time), I thought I'd do a little shameless plugging. The Flyer is out! I received my copies a couple of weeks ago and it's so beautiful, I nearly cried. The artists at Medallion Press are certainly talented.

Here endeth the self-promotion and on to my actual posting: I've been watching Legends of the Fall repeatedly for the past week or so. Research, of course. My next novel has a hunter hero running from a past he can't get away from, and in LotF, Tristan also ends up in Africa as he runs from the guilt that he couldn't save his brother during the Great War. Recent events in my life have made the concept of happily-ever-after a little hard to write, so I'm thinking of taking this new project in a different direction... the epic novel that might be VERY romantic, but isn't a romance, per se.

My question for writers and readers alike is this: Writers: Do you ever find yourself in a position where you're unable to abide by the standards of your genre and the muse insists on taking you in another direction? And if so, do you listen to the genre or the muse?

And readers: If you're a romance fan, and a romance novelist you've enjoyed reading suddenly switches to another genre, would you tar and feather? Would you read the new work because you like the writer? Or would you simply skip that book and wait for another steamy romance with the traditional HEA?

I can feel the writing bug beginning to itch and after being blocked for nearly a year, I'm terrified to pick up the pen, so to speak. I'll be anxiously waiting any sage responses, and in the meantime... Tristan, Alfred, Susanna and Isabel 2 await...

Marjorie

1 comment:

Erastes said...

As a writer: (and as a reader actually) I dislike "genre" completely. I agree that some people like to know what's in the book before I read it but i emphatically don't - hence the interest in "unusual historicals".

I want my books to blend and blur - and some of my favourite books of all time do just that. The Vintner's Luck for example - historical/fantasy/family saga/homosexual heartbreaking story.

If a writer changes their genre? It depends on whether they can do the change. JKR (I've heard) is planning a mystery although I don't know how true that is - and I'm just tittering behind my hand. She can't keep her facts and maths straight for five minutes in the Potter books, I can't see her managing a mystery.